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Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Oromo Verbs

Ethiopian Argument | Wednesday, April 30, 2014
 Welcome to the 10th lesson about verbs in Oromo. We will first learn about the present tense, followed by the past tense, and future tense. We will also analyze some grammar rules, and finally practice how to ask for direction in Oromo.
Verbs are used to express an action (I swim) or a state of being (I am). The present tense in Oromo conveys a situation or event in the present time. Here are some examples:
Present TenseOromo
I speak Englishingiliffa nan dubbadha
you speak Frenchafaan faransaayi dubbata
he speaks Germanafaan jarmanii dubbata
she speaks Italianafaan xaliyaani dubbatti
we speak Arabicafaan arabaa dubbanna
they speak Chineseafaan chayina dubbatu

The past tense in Oromo conveys a situation or event in the past time. Here are some examples:
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Oromo Grammar

Ethiopian Argument | Wednesday, April 30, 2014
Welcome to the 8th lesson about Oromo grammar. We will first learn about prepositions, negation, questions, adverbs, and pronouns including: personal, object and possessive pronouns.
We will start with prepositions. In general, they are used to link words to other words. For example: I speak Oromo andEnglish the preposition is [and] because it connects both words Oromo and English. The following is a list of the most used prepositions in Oromo.

PrepositionsOromo
andfi
abovegubbaa / gararraa
underjala / gajjallaa
beforedura
afterbooddee / booda
in front offullee isaa
behinddudduuba / dugda duuba
far fromirraa siqee / iraa fagaatee
nearbira
inkeessa
insidekeessa
outsideala
withwajjin
withoutmalee
aboutwaa'ee
betweengidduu
butgaruu
forf
fromirraa, ittii
toitti

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Oromo Phrases

Ethiopian Argument | Wednesday, April 30, 2014
Welcome to our seventh lesson about popular Oromo phrases. This page will include greetings, questions, emergency and survival expressions, asking for direction, language practice, introducing yourself, holiday wishes, and finally some travel phrases.

Holiday WishesOromo
Happy birthdayayyaana dhalootaa gaarii
Happy new yearayyaana haaraa gaarii
Merry Christmasayyaana dhalootaa kiristoos gaarii hata'u
Good luckcarraa gaarii, (or milkaa'a)
Congratulationsbaga gamadan

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Oromo Numbers

Ethiopian Argument | Wednesday, April 30, 2014
Welcome to the sixth Oromo lesson about numbers. This time we will learn about cardinal and ordinal numbers, followed by grammar rules, then animal names, finally a conversation in Oromo to help you practice your daily phrases.
CardinalOromoOrdinalOromo
onetokkofirsttokkoffaa
twolamasecondlammaffaa
threesadiithirdsadaffaa
fourafurfourtharfaffaa
fiveshanfifthshanaffaa
sixjaa'asixthjaa'affaa
seventorbaseventhtorbaffaa
eightsaddeeteighthsaddeetaffaa
ninesagalninthsaglaffaa
tenkudhantenthkurnaffaa
elevenkudhatokkoeleventhkudhatokkoffaa
twelvekudhalamatwelfthkudhalammaffaa
thirteenkudhasadiithirteenthkudhasadaffaa
fourteenkudhafuronceal-tokko
fifteenkudhashantwiceal-lama
sixteenkudhajaa'aMondaydafinoo / ojja duree
seventeenkudhatorbaTuesdayfacaasaa
eighteenkudhasaddeetWednesdayroobii
nineteenkudhasagalThursdaykamisa
twentydigdamaFridayjimaata
seventy onetorbaatami tokkoSaturdaysambata xinnaa / sambata duraa
one hundreddhibba tokkoSundaydilbata / sambata guddaa

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Oromo Gender

Ethiopian Argument | Wednesday, April 30, 2014
Welcome to the fifth Oromo lesson about gender. This time we will view a list of people, feminine and masculine, followed by grammar rules, finally a list of expressions in Oromo to help you practice your daily phrases.
man
man
dhira
woman
woman
dubartii
husband
husband
dhirsa
wife
wife
niitii
boy
boy
gurbaa
girl
girl
intala
father
father
abbaa
mother
mother
haadha

Gender Grammar Rules
In general, gender is used to distinguish between male and female, sometimes referred to as masculine and feminine. For example: my son and daughter are students the noun [son] is masculine, while [daughter] is feminine. The following examples use gender in different ways and places to demonstrate their behavior.
Grammar + RulesOromo
my son is a student
[masculine + noun]
ilmi kiyya barataadha 
her daughter is a student
[feminine + noun]
intalli se barattuudha 
he has a tall brother
[adjective + masculine]
inni oboleessa dheera tokko qaba 
she has a tall sister
[adjective + feminine]
obboleetti dheertu tokko qabdi 
his brothers are young
[plural masculine + adjective]
obbolewwaan sa ijoolleedha 
his sisters are young
[plural feminine + adjective]
obbolettiwaan sa ijoolledha 
The list below will probably provide more clarification. These are family members (males and females). I think it would be wise to memorize them as part of your important vocabulary list.
son
son
ilma
daughter
daughter
intala
brother
brother
obboleessa
sister
sister
obboleettii
grandfather
grandfather
akaakayyuu
grandmother
grandmother
akkawoo
child
child
mucaa
children
children
mucoolii

Expressions in Oromo
Now it's time to practice expressions used in daily conversations. If you're a beginner in learning Oromo, then the phrases below are something you would want to know.
EnglishOromo
What do you mean?maal jechuu keeti?
I don't understandnaa ngalle
I don't knowan hinbeeku
What is that called in Oromo?afaan oromootin maal jedhama?
What is this?kun maal inni?
What does that word mean in English?jechi kun afaan ingiliizitin maal jedhaa?
Sorry (if you made a mistake)dhiifama

Source: learn101

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Oromo Plural

Ethiopian Argument | Wednesday, April 30, 2014
Welcome to the fourth Oromo lesson about the plural. This time we will learn about the singular form and what it looks like in the plural, followed by grammar rules, finally a list of emergency phrases.

book
book
kitaaba
books
books
kitaaboota
car
car
makiinaa
cars
cars
makiinoota
tree
tree
muka
trees
trees
mekeelee
flower
flower
daraaraa
flowers
flowers
daraaraa

Plural Grammar Rules
The plural is the form which refers to more than one object or person. For example: I speak two
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Oromo Nouns

Ethiopian Argument | Wednesday, April 30, 2014
Welcome to the third Oromo lesson about nouns. This time we will first learn about fruits and vegetables, followed bygrammar rules, then food items, finally a conversation in Oromo to help you practice your daily phrases.

potatoes
potatoes
dinnichaa
tomatoes
tomatoes
timaantima
onions
onions
shunkurtaa
carrots
carrots
kaarootii
fruits
fruits
muduraa
apples
apples
miilloo
bananas
bananas
muuzii
oranges
oranges
burtukaanii

Nouns Grammar Rules
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Oromo Adjectives

Ethiopian Argument | Wednesday, April 30, 2014
 This time we will first learn about colors, followed by grammar rules, then weather expressions, finally a conversation in Oromo to help you practice your daily phrases.
black
black
gurraacha
grey
grey
daalacha
white
white
adii
blue
blue
baluu
green
green
magariisa
yellow
yellow 
red
red
diimaa
brown
brown
bifa bunaa

Adjectives Grammar Rules
In general adjectives are words which describe or modify another person or object in a given sentence. For
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Oromo Alphabet

Ethiopian Argument | Wednesday, April 30, 2014
Today I will teach you the Oromo alphabet. If you follow everything provided in this page, you will be able to read, write and pronounce the Oromo letters quickly and easily. I'm providing the sound so that you can hear the pronunciation of the characters. Oromo contains 26 letters (consonants and vowels). Below you will find the letters, the pronunciation and sound.

A
a
[aa]

like
ask
B
b
[bee]

like
bird
C
c
[see]

like
cat, ice
D
d
[dee]

like
day
E
e
[ee]

like
eat
F
f
[ef]

like
fly
G
g
[gee]

like
gold
H
h
[haa]

like
help
I
i
[ie]

like
India
J
j
[jot]

like
yes
K
k
[kaa]

like
kiss
L
l
[el]

like
life
M
m
[em]

like
man
N
n
[en]

like
nice
O
o
[oo]

like
old
P
p
[pee]

like
play
Q
q
[kuu]

like
quit
R
r
[er]

like
rice
S
s
[es]

like
sea
T
t
[tee]

like
time
U
u
[uu]

like
urge
V
v
[vau]

like
very
W
w
[wee]

like
west
X
x
[ex]

like
ox
Y
y
[y]

like
day
Z
z
[set]

like
zoo

Source: learn101

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